This Blog’s Top Posts for 2009

As I am almost ready to resume winding down this blog, as I keep promising to do soon, here is a sample of what 2009 looked like on this blog, in terms of the ten most viewed essays. Unfortunately it seems that WordPress only counts on-site page views, when posts viewed by various feed readers are usually twice to three times as many in this blog’s case. The total number of on-site views for this blog, since its inception on 11 October 2007, stands at 307,653 as of this moment.

  1. America’s Iranian Twitter Revolution – 6,200
  2. M. Jamil Hanifi: Engineering Division, Instability, and Regime Change with Naheed, Neda, and Allah – 5,693
  3. The Unreported Death of Staff Sgt. Paula Loyd of the Human Terrain System: Third Researcher to Die – 4,775
  4. Some Breaking News on the Human Terrain System: Death Threats Against Female Colleagues – 4,378
  5. A Minor Bun Engine Made Benny Lava, May He Poop on My Knee: Cross-Cultural Translation Under Conditions of Contemporary Electronic Globalization – 1,928
  6. Frantz Fanon: “Concerning Violence” – 1,912
  7. Whitewashing a U.S. War Crime in Afghanistan: The Trial of Don Ayala, “Human Terrain” Mercenary – 1,712
  8. Anthropologist Under Attack: University of East London Punishes Chris Knight Over His Public Speech – 1,368
  9. The Deafening Silence of the “Milbloggers”: Inconvenient Truths? – 1,290
  10. Professor Richard Antoun, murdered Fri. Dec. 4, 2009: We Will Miss You, May God Bless You – 1,164

The top search terms in 2009 that brought readers to this blog were:

  1. paula loyd – 4,730
  2. open anthropology – 2,330
  3. idi amin – 2,181
  4. national geographic – 1,506
  5. human terrain system – 1,279
  6. national geographic photos – 830
  7. don ayala – 716
  8. benny lava – 707
  9. gaza live cam – 637
  10. shelby lee adams – 542

I think some of the best posts remain for the end of this blog, although, as is often the case, what I think is the best and what viewers find most interesting often differ considerably.

I will have a more complete roundup of the statistics for the cluster of sites that formed part of the Open Anthropology Project, at the close of this blog.

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