Militarizing Africa and African Studies and the U.S. Africanist Response

By David Wiley [First published as: Wiley, David. (2012). “Militarizing Africa and African Studies and the U.S. Africanist Response.” African Studies Review, 24(2) September, pp. 147-161.] There was an ironic and troubling confluence in the 1958-64 years when simultaneously the majority of African nations won their independence, the Soviet Sputnik went up and shocked Americans […]

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When Did Today Begin?

Book Review: Slouching Towards Sirte: NATO’s War on Libya and Africa by Maximilian Forte By Donnchadh Mac an Ghoill 21/05/13 When did today begin? A question many poets and philosophers have asked. For many, who had relied the soft resistances of the mind – the resistance of text, of music, of democratic spaces – for […]

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Podcasts: NATO, AFRICOM, Racism, and the War on Libya

December 12, 2012. Interviewed by Brendan Stone, CFMU 93.3 FM, “Unusual Sources” (Maximilian C. Forte does not let us forget about what happened in Libya – from the propaganda build-up to the NATO intervention to the punishing aftermath. His new book, Slouching Towards Sirte, serves as both an investigation and a warning: what happened to […]

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The State Department’s “Report” on the Attack in Benghazi, Libya: The Effects of Diplomacy as Subversion

Originally published on CounterPunch on December 20, 2012. Almost immediately after the armed attack in Benghazi, Libya, on September 11, 2012, which resulted in the death of U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens, along with Sean Smith, Tyrone Woods, and Glen Doherty, added to the destruction and looting of the U.S. facility in Benghazi, various columnists immediately took […]

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A War for Human Rights?

Originally published by The Political Bouillon on December 8, 2012. Republished on Global Research as Destroying Libya: A War for “Human Rights”? Adapted, translated and republished  on Tiempos de furia as ¿Qué pasó en Libia? SOS por un país arrasado The war in Libya never happened. At least that is what one might think, considering the dearth of serious analysis […]

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Education as Oppression: One Bedouin’s Perspective on Progress

To say that anthropologists have long been interested in pastoral nomads would be an understatement. As Rada and Neville Dyson-Hudson described the situation in their 1980 article in the Annual Review of Anthropology: “Pastoral nomads have had a persistent fascination for anthropologists,” a fascination that has to do with the “intriguing and difficult to unravel” […]

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Remembering Gaddafi, One Year Later

Gaddafi is Gone, the War Continues I am a couple of days late in commemorating the date when Muammar Gaddafi was brutally lynched in Sirte, Libya, after first being bombed by NATO jets and surviving missiles fired from U.S. Predator drones, only to be sodomized with a knife, beaten, and then shot (by a French […]

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The Apotheosis of St. Christopher of Libya

“Greater love hath no man than this that a man lay down his life for his friends,” the president said, quoting scripture. … “Because of these patriots, and because of you, this country that we love will always shine as a light onto the world.” In an effort not to seethe further at the absurdity […]

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Libya: What Revolution? Whose Revolution?

If David Cameron had been known for modeling his speeches on old Monty Python films, then he might be praised for his witty and clever genius in devising such a politically and morally fraudulent speech such as the one above. He opens with gushing sentiment about a “new beginning for Libya,” hailing freedom from violence even as his jets pound Libyan targets. As always before, the British love to set an example on how politics are to be done, and it was usually with a good whipping followed by tutorials on how to best mimic the master, with powdered wigs, robes, and a broken sense of self….

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Libya and the Passive Repeaters: Deploying Depleted Information Warheads

A video that in many ways corresponds with what I argued in “America’s Iranian Twitter Revolution,” the video below in part shows how the use of social media to make falsified versions of Libyan reality can go viral–radioactive–producing an intellectually toxic swarm of passive repeaters. Critical questions are like static, they interrupt the clarity of the message: dictator vs. revolutionaries, support the people, implement a no-fly zone right now. But this is so patronizing, it denies “agency”–just like the agency of the consumer who must decide and then boldly act on which colour iPod™ to buy. Have a look at The Guardian’s “Revealed: US spy operation that manipulates social media: Military’s ‘sock puppet’ software creates fake online identities to spread pro-American propaganda.”…Also check “‘Post-Qaddafi Libya’: on the Globalist Road,” “Who are the Libyan Freedom Fighters and Their Patrons?” “US-trained [and U.S.-based] economist, Libyan rebels’ new finance minister,” and “New Libyan rebel leader spent much of past 20 years in suburban Virginia.”….

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