George Marcus: “No New Ideas” (2.0) & the After-Life of Anthropology (1.1)

In a recent notification of new articles in Cultural Anthropology, I saw this particular item: Cultural Anthropology 23.1 (February 2008) IN CONVERSATION: George Marcus and Marcelo Pisarro, “The End(s) of Ethnography: Social/Cultural Anthropology’s Signature Form of Producing Knowledge in Transition” In an extended abstract of the piece that was circulated by email, the journal editors […]

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Transforming Academia

A book review by Margaret Taylor. BASCH, L., L. SAUNDERS, J. SHARP & J. PEACOCK (eds). Transforming academia: challenges and opportunities for an engaged anthropology. viii, 312 pp., tables, bibliogr. Arlington, Va: American Anthropological Association, 1999. Transforming academia is the outcome of the 1996 conference ‘Restructuring academia’, held at the New York Academy of Sciences, […]

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The Political Economy of Academia

Anthropology News, the newsletter of the American Anthropological Association, has issued a call for papers (the deadline has passed) for a special issue on the political economy of academia. The outline for this is very interesting: Where are current economic and cultural trends in higher learning taking us? With a changing economy, the number of […]

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Conversation on Journals and Open Access Publishing

Several months ago, the Media Anthropology Network of the European Association of Social Anthropologists, was the site of an informal discussion on journals and open access publishing. It was a wide ranging debate, involving issues of delays in the peer review process, to the nature of peer review, the origins of peer review, the question […]

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Empty Scholasticism at its Best on the AAA Blog

Having read through over 60 comments posted thus far on the blog of the American Anthropological Association, devoted to debate over the AAA Executive Board’s decision to condemn anthropological involvement in the Human Terrain System project as a violation of its code of ethics, I am struck by the vain scholasticism of some of the […]

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Why is Anthropology Linked to Counterinsurgency?

Still speaking of comments posted in the discussion on the AAA’s new blog, I noted that one writer in particular posted the following reasonable objection, one that unveils certain facts that I myself have downplayed: Recently, I listened to McFate, the HTS [Human Terrain System] designer, present the basic structure of the HTS as well as […]

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Anthropologists React to the AAA Statement on the Ethics of Counterinsurgency Research

Readers can quickly see the comments being posted by anthropologists, predominantly American, ranging from students to senior professors, by clicking on this link. These comments are posted with reference to the recent release of a statement from the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association on the Human Terrain System Project. The concluding two paragraphs […]

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The Ethics of Conference Attendance

On a neighbouring blog, The Other Librarian, I came across an interesting discussion of an issue that I had begun to think about with greater seriousness in the last two years, concerning the ethics of conference attendance. The blogger is Ryan Deschamps, a librarian in Halifax, Nova Scotia–alright, I admit it, he is ahead of […]

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