Minerva Project Now Official and Ready to Begin

[Note that the official document discussed below can be downloaded from here (pdf).] The Minerva Research Initiative (MRI) has now become official and is ready to begin accepting grant proposals. Proposals are being accepted for projects that address any of the following areas (with a detailed breakdown of each area provided in the document linked […]

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Weaponizing Anthropology: An Overview

Weaponizing Anthropology: Social Science in Service of the Militarized State. By David H. Price. Published by CounterPunch and AK Press, Petrolia and Oakland, CA, 2011. ISBN-13: 9781849350631. 219 pages. For students already in anthropology and those interested in perhaps becoming anthropology students, for those researching the history and political economy of the social sciences, and […]

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General Carter Ham’s Case for Dismantling AFRICOM

There is enough evidence that the US Africa Command has increased resource exploitation and imperial expansion, instigated more violence, intensified regional conflicts and undermined the authority of regional organizations and the African Union. First published as: “Dismantle AFRICOM! General Carter Ham makes the case?” By Horace G. Campbell Pambazuka, 2012-12-13, Issue 610 INTRODUCTION On Saturday […]

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Militarizing Africa and African Studies and the U.S. Africanist Response

By David Wiley [First published as: Wiley, David. (2012). “Militarizing Africa and African Studies and the U.S. Africanist Response.” African Studies Review, 24(2) September, pp. 147-161.] There was an ironic and troubling confluence in the 1958-64 years when simultaneously the majority of African nations won their independence, the Soviet Sputnik went up and shocked Americans […]

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Complying with “Counter-Terrorism”: State Securitization of Canadian Academia (part 1)

Insidious Security Recently I was contacted by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), to serve as a peer reviewer for research grant proposals submitted under the new “Connection Program”. Having publicly criticized the structure and uneven geographical and institutional distribution of SSHRC funding in the past (see [1], [2], [3], [4]), […]

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U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM): Commemorating Columbus Day 2010

Readers will appreciate that a tremendous amount of historical research, and interviews with participants, went into this project to present the true history of the voyages of Christopher Columbus to Afghanistan, a history that thus far has been replete with misconceptions, unsubstantiated rumour, and popular myths. Clearly, Columbus and his brothers are to be celebrated […]

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Worried about Iraqis writing their own history? Then let’s violate international law, again

Military-controlled Information Access, Academic Imperialism, and the Cultural Cleansing of Iraq On three previous occasions I raised the issue of the illegality of seizing Iraqi documents, relocating them to the U.S., and then controlling access to them for the purpose especially of Pentagon-funded academic researchers–see: “Minerva Research Initiative Violates International Law and Iraqi Sovereignty,” and […]

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SCRATs: AFRICOM after the Human Terrain System

For almost two years we have heard little more than passing statements and speculation about the U.S. Army’s Africa Command (AFRICOM) adopting the “human terrain” concept or deploying human terrain teams in Africa, even if individuals in the Human Terrain System seemed relatively confident this would happen (particularly, Montgomery McFate on the Charlie Rose show […]

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Coming soon on Al Jazeera.net

Starting next month, I will be joining Al Jazeera as the author of a series of monthly columns, beginning with articles on issues raised here, dealing with soft power, social media, digital activism, and almost certainly something about the Minerva Research Initiative and the Human Terrain System. I am very thankful to Al Jazeera’s editors […]

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Information Traffickers of the Imperial State: American Anthropologists and Other Academics

From the Homeland Security Act of 2002: “The Secretary, acting through the Under Secretary for Science and Technology, shall designate a university-based center or several university-based centers for homeland security. The purpose of the center or these centers shall be to establish a coordinated, university-based system to enhance the nation’s homeland security.” Uniform “Research” We […]

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Bibliography and Archive: The Military, Intelligence Agencies, and the Academy (with special reference to anthropology) – Documents, News, Reports

By Maximilian C. Forte Over 470 reports have been published online concerning the relationships between anthropology, other parts of academia, and the military and intelligence agencies since 2001. The items covered here consist of online publications of the mainstream and alternative media, documents online referred to by journalists, statements and reports from professional associations, and […]

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Bibliography and Archive: The Military, Intelligence Agencies, and the Academy (with special reference to anthropology) – Documents, News, Reports

Over 470 reports have been published online concerning the relationships between anthropology, other parts of academia, and the military and intelligence agencies since 2001. The items covered here consist of online publications of the mainstream and alternative media, documents online referred to by journalists, statements and reports from professional associations, and journal publications by some […]

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So much to write, so little time…

While the Zero Series of essays was (and still is) intended to be the mode by which this blog comes to a close (so that I can move on to other projects, more below), it seems that will take much longer than expected. Though the series is based on lecture notes and readings assigned for […]

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News: Militarizing the Social Sciences and Humanities in Canada

As has been anticipated in previous posts over the past year, the drafting of social science and humanities research for the purpose of Canadian counterinsurgency has finally surfaced in a public call to researchers (not necessarily restricted to Afghanistan either, since the early release of Canada’s counterinsurgency manual also directed its attention at Haiti, where […]

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