0.185: Terms of Incorporation, Concepts of Domination

Phrases such as “decolonizing anthropology”* and “anthropology and the colonial encounter” have become salient in anthropology especially since they are the titles of two of the better known, most widely quoted books on the subject. What subject? That is what is lacking clarity, because presumably the phrases above are meant to mean something, and if […]

Read More…

Claude Lévi-Strauss: à la prochaine fois

Almost one year ago we celebrated the remarkable 100th birthday of Claude Lévi-Strauss. Today we learn that his body has died. In the meantime, we continue to work with what he has left us, as can be seen in the latest posts on this blog concerning his vision of a future anthropology, as seen back […]

Read More…

News from the Military-Academic Complex: McFate’s PhD, HTS Contracts, Minerva Grants, Afghanistan

Here is a medley of updates concerning previous posts on this blog: Concerning Montgomery McFate’s doctoral dissertation: Montgomery McFate’s PhD dissertation (when she was Montgomery Cybele Carlough) has been digitized in its entirety and is available for download by persons using libraries with subscriptions to ProQuest. What follows are some of the significant details about […]

Read More…

This Be The Verse

This Be The Verse — by Philip Larkin They fuck you up, your mum and dad. They may not mean to, but they do. They fill you with the faults they had And add some extra, just for you. But they were fucked up in their turn By fools in old-style hats and coats, Who […]

Read More…

Response: The OAC’s Name

Hopefully this new post will not bring to an abrupt end the discussion that continued in the comments to the last post. One of the administrators of the “Open Anthropology Cooperative” has issued the OAC’s first coherent statement regarding “the name issue,” which as I have explained is about much more than just a name. […]

Read More…

There Can Be Only One!

Terrible burden this is, to have to play the hero defending his good name on the battlefield. Ah but such is the life of the immortal one…and there can be only one. What’s in a name, an expropriated, coopted, appropriated name? For anthropologists, quite a lot. Names do matter. They know that. And if it […]

Read More…

How to Get More Frequent Flyer Miles for Your Zombie

Is it a surprise any more, that Paula Loyd should be resurrected for one more promotional tour for the U.S. Army’s Human Terrain System? I am referring here specifically to the piece by Amy Yee, in the June 2009 issue of The Progressive, conveniently titled “A Friend Falls in Afghanistan” (thanks to a commentator on […]

Read More…

Worldwide Popular Interest in Anthropology, 2004-2009: Online Search Statistics

Google Insights reveals some interesting comparative data on the popularity trends of various terms and authors in anthropology. I have only scratched the surface, not having conducted very refined comparisons of specific anthropological concepts, theories, schools, etc., although presumably all of these statistical comparisons can now be done. The statistics generated by Google Insights simply […]

Read More…

Best of Anthropology Blogging: Call for Submissions

Conceived, organized, and hosted by Neuroanthropology: Best of Anthropology Blogging 2008: Call for Submissions We’ve decided to host something that has not been done before – the first yearly edition of The Best of Anthropology Blogging. An increasing number of anthropologists are blogging about their work and their ideas, sharing how anthropology in all its forms […]

Read More…

“Anthropologize” This!

“I’m frequently accused of militarizing anthropology,” she said. “But we’re really anthropologizing the military.” — Montgomery McFate (source) “We’re looking at this from a human perspective, from a social scientist’s perspective.”– Col. Martin Schweitzer in Afghanistan (source) “This ‘cultural turn’ within DoD [Department of Defense] highlights efforts to understand adversary societies and to recruit ‘practitioners’ […]

Read More…