Colonial Feminism, Liberal “Progress,” and the Weakness of the Left

[Max Forte: Welcome to Brendan Stone who, along with Donnchadh Mac an Ghoill, joins ZA as a writer.] In view of Quebec’s Charter debate, the resurgence of discussions of the burqa and the niqab, and the continuing stories in the Western press of women’s oppression in Afghanistan, readers may be interested in this update of a paper written in… Read More Colonial Feminism, Liberal “Progress,” and the Weakness of the Left

Colonial and Anti-Imperial Anthropology

The following quotes come from John Gledhill’s Power and its Disguises: Anthropological Perspectives on Politics, 2nd ed. (London: Pluto, 2000). page 1: Half a century ago, the subject matter and relevance of political anthropology still seemed relatively easy to define. Under Western colonial regimes, one of the most valuable kinds of knowledge which anthropologists could… Read More Colonial and Anti-Imperial Anthropology

0.20: “Potentially Dangerous Implications for the Practice of Anthropology Today”

[This is the first in a descending series of articles that will bring this blog to a close.] Circle the Wagons! If the “nativism” that Adam Kuper alleges was spawned by the marriage of American post-modernism and radical political engagement means that only the native can speak for the native, then Kuper will have none… Read More 0.20: “Potentially Dangerous Implications for the Practice of Anthropology Today”

“The Mongoose,” by Derek Walcott, has a bigger bite than one might think (1.2)

“It’s going to be nasty,” Derek Walcott said, prefacing his war on V. S. Naipaul with a warning. “The Mongoose” was the last of Walcott’s new poems at the Calabash Literary Festival in Jamaica last weekend [May 2008]. He’d wondered whether he ought to read it, Walcott said, “and then I figured if I don’t… Read More “The Mongoose,” by Derek Walcott, has a bigger bite than one might think (1.2)