Complying with “Counter-Terrorism”: State Securitization of Canadian Academia (part 3)

(Part 1) (Part 2) Complying with “Counter-Terrorism,” Practicing Domestic Counterinsurgency Canada has a very long history of practicing various forms of counterinsurgency (military, political, and even religious), first against Indigenous Peoples, then against the citizens of other nations such as Afghanistan, and now against its own citizens at home. The place that inspired Apartheid, has […]

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Complying with “Counter-Terrorism”: State Securitization of Canadian Academia (part 2)

(Part 1) Taking Hostages: Research Funding to “Prevent Terrorism” Earlier this year, on January 25, 2012, Canada’s rather infamous and unpopular Minister of Public Safety, Vic Toews, announced the first call for proposals for the Kanishka Project, “a multi-year investment in terrorism-focused research by the Government of Canada”. (It’s somehow both chilling and comical: that […]

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Complying with “Counter-Terrorism”: State Securitization of Canadian Academia (part 1)

Insidious Security Recently I was contacted by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), to serve as a peer reviewer for research grant proposals submitted under the new “Connection Program”. Having publicly criticized the structure and uneven geographical and institutional distribution of SSHRC funding in the past (see [1], [2], [3], [4]), […]

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National Security Research and the Geopolitical Context of Knowledge Production

Thinking about Hugh Gusterson’s “The U.S. Military’s Quest to Weaponize Culture” prompted me to consider some current developments, as reported by various news agencies and one think tank, as indications of new conditions of knowledge production and the kinds of pressures and constraints orienting social science research toward specific ends. For some these are “constraints,” […]

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