U.S. Congress and the Human Terrain System

To supplement the report by John Stanton, “US Congress Requests Assessment of Army‘s Human Terrain System: Independent Assessment Due from SECDEF by March 2010,” one should note the following background documents to which the request for the assessment refers. The NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010 points out that, In the committee report […]

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John Stanton: U.S. Congress to Assess Human Terrain System

This is John Stanton’s 19th article on the Human Terrain System, with his previous ones available here at: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18. Once again, this article was sent in by John and is gratefully reproduced here with his permission. I am also happy to advertise the fact that John has published a book of his work […]

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Afghanistan: The Unwinnable War

More U.S. troops to Afghanistan? Why the war in Afghanistan cannot be won By Hugh Gusterson | 21 September 2009 [reproduced with the permission of the author] A number of commentators have remarked of late on the ominous parallels between the situation in Afghanistan today and the quagmire in Vietnam in the 1960s: “The war […]

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Afghanistan’s Little Girls on the Front Line, Part 2

This post was previously published as a comment by M. Jamil Hanifi, Open Anthropology’s new blogger. While we work out bugs with Jamil’s access, I am republishing his comment as a post. It first appeared in connection with the article, “In Afghanistan It’s Now All About the Little Girls“. M. Jamil Hanifi 15 August 2009 […]

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John Stanton: Human Terrain System in the Kill-Pacify Chain

A warm welcome back to John Stanton: this is his 18th article on the Human Terrain System, with his previous ones available here at: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17. Once again, this article was sent in by John and is reproduced here with his permission. So far, this is one of the clearest indications of the roles performed […]

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What are the Pentagon’s Minerva Researchers Doing?

(This post comes thanks to some leads on the James Petras website and Petras’ own essay on the Minerva Research Initiative, “Procuring Academics for Empire: The Pentagon Minerva Research Initiative“.) In late December of 2008 I posted about the news of the first recipients of the Pentagon’s Minerva Research Initiative, but until I saw the […]

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Militarizing the Social Sciences: Tom Burghardt

“Militarizing the Social Sciences” is a very effective overview essay written by Tom Burghardt of Antifascist Calling, and published by Global Research.ca on August 6, 2008. Burghardt covers the Minerva Research Initiative and the Human Terrain System, placing these within the context of a fairly well established tradition of coopting social sciences for national security […]

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National Security Research and the Geopolitical Context of Knowledge Production

Thinking about Hugh Gusterson’s “The U.S. Military’s Quest to Weaponize Culture” prompted me to consider some current developments, as reported by various news agencies and one think tank, as indications of new conditions of knowledge production and the kinds of pressures and constraints orienting social science research toward specific ends. For some these are “constraints,” […]

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More Minerva News and Discussion (2.1)

David Glenn, Chronicle of Higher Education, June 30, 2008 Minerva Takes Flesh: Pentagon and Science Foundation Sign Social-Science Deal In a memorandum of understanding that was signed today, the Department of Defense and the National Science Foundation agreed to work cooperatively to support social-science research on topics of interest to the Pentagon. As widely expected, […]

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