Anthropology in Canada: Number of Students, Female Percentage

According to the latest issue of the CAUT Almanac (2010-2011, see p. 31), published by the Canadian Association of University Teachers, the following are the available nationwide statistics on the number of anthropology students  (full time equivalents) in Canada, and the percentage that is female: Bachelor’s and Other Undergraduate Degree: 4,005.4 students, 73.9% of which… Read More Anthropology in Canada: Number of Students, Female Percentage

Anthropology, Philanthropy, and Empire

Published yesterday in Dissident Voice, Michael Barker‘s article “Foundations and Anthropology in the United States,” could be very useful reading for students, those who may not be too familiar with the role of elites in shaping and founding key pillars of American anthropology, and members of the broader public. Speaking of the latter, this article… Read More Anthropology, Philanthropy, and Empire

Neocolonialism: It’s Post-Independence, Not Post-Colonial

Unintended Open Source Ethnography For as much serendipity as conventional, on the ground, ethnography is known to entail, the “approach” discussed here is barely an approach at all: it was unprovoked, unplanned, without coordination, being neither methodical nor systematic.  It became a collaboration, out of mutual interest, from distinct and separate positions, but there was… Read More Neocolonialism: It’s Post-Independence, Not Post-Colonial

0.18: Anthropology and the Rise of the Social Sciences within the Structures of Knowledge – Immanuel Wallerstein

Professional Knowledge Creation in the World-System Building an anti-imperialist “anthropology,” plus an anthropology that studies imperialism, and that studies itself as a received invention of imperialism, means much more than just analyzing and questioning how anthropologists served this or that colonial venture. It means totally unthinking anthropology as a social science; more than that, it… Read More 0.18: Anthropology and the Rise of the Social Sciences within the Structures of Knowledge – Immanuel Wallerstein