An Anthropological Preview of the Post-9/11 World

I accidentally came across this piece by Thomas Hylland Eriksen, a Norwegian anthropologist, titled “The Paranoid Phase of Globalisation.” It was published in openDemocracy just a little over a month after the 11 September 2001 attacks in New York and Washington D.C., and it was interesting to note Eriksen’s predictions at the time: Imagine this […]

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M. Jamil Hanifi: Engineering Division, Instability, and Regime Change with Naheed, Neda, and Allah

The following article has been submitted for reproduction on this blog by the author. The author is thanked for making this work openly accessible and for contributing to this project’s strong concern for the continued war of occupation of Afghanistan. Engineering Division, Instability, and Regime Change with Naheed, Neda, and Allah M. JAMIL HANIFI American […]

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Some People Push Back: On the Justice of Roosting Chickens

Note: This is still the most memorable, most prominent, and arguably most important essay on 11 September 2001 written by any American intellectual. It was monumental primarily for being reasonable and fair, two qualities absent from the mainstream, authorized discussions about American imperialism abroad, and at home. The honesty, clarity, and lucidity of this piece […]

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The Two Terrors of 2008: End of Year Post

This year seems to have ended on a very different set of notes than how it began, and the theme might be that “two terrors are better than one.” The first terror, the one we have known since this new imperial rampage poorly/ironically named the “global war of terror” began in 2001, accompanied by neoliberal […]

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In Support of Bill Ayers

It has been painful to sit through countless verbal lashings of Bill Ayers by the likes of Sarah Palin and John McCain, the tarring he gets with labels such as “domestic terrorist” and “washed up old terrorist” (a rich one, coming from the likes of McCain) to then find out that William Ayers is in […]

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Too Much Madness for a Monday Morning

I have no “Monday Morning Madness” post of my own today — there was far too much madness to go around and I could not settle on a choice. Trust me, I tried, but between Alan Greenspan saying he was “partially wrong” and there was “a flaw” in his ideology (testifying in the Waxman House […]

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Hugh Gusterson: “Minerva Controversy,” and the SSRC

The U.S. Social Science Research Council has launched a series of articles in a special section of its website devoted to what it calls the Minerva Controversy. Among them is Hugh Gusterson’s “Unveiling Minerva.” This is a list of some of the key points he makes in his article: (1) Gusterson persuasively likens Pentagon funding […]

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